The agreement was approved by voters across the island of Ireland in two referendums on 22 May 1998. In Northern Ireland, in the 1998 referendum on the Good Friday Agreement in Northern Ireland, voters were asked if they supported the multi-party agreement. In the Republic of Ireland, voters were asked whether they would allow the state to sign the agreement and allow the necessary constitutional amendments (Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution of Ireland) to facilitate it. Citizens of both jurisdictions had to approve the agreement for it to enter into force. The British Army suspended operations in Northern Ireland from 1 August 2007, ending a 38-year presence in Northern Ireland. Nevertheless, the group continued to reject the peace agreement signed in April.5 The ceasefire was maintained for the rest of the year. The 1998 agreement was not implemented either in spirit or in practice 1.16 When Secretary of State Mo Mowlam presented the Belfast Agreement to Parliament ten days later, she chose the term Good Friday Agreement.15 And so it remained (to the point that in the spring of 1999, the anniversary of the agreement was proclaimed on 2 April, Good Friday of this year16). . .

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