However, as government officials were well aware, such actions would likely have triggered World War III. Syria has withdrawn its troops from most of the areas it controls west of the international border, which have become demilitarized zones. The territory retained by Syria, located west of the 1923 Palestinian border and assigned to the Jewish state under the United Nations partition plan, included 66 square kilometers in the Jordan Valley. [11] These areas were designated as Demilitarized Zones (DMZs) and remained under Syrian control. It was stressed that the ceasefire line “should not be interpreted in such a way that it has any connection with the final territorial agreements”. [58] Ceasefire talks with Syria began in April 1949 in Gesher B`not Yaacov, Jordan River,[10] after the other ceasefire agreements had ended. The agreement with Syria was signed on July 20, 1949. [4] Chinese and North Korean military commanders signed the agreement on the one hand, with the US-led UN command signing on behalf of the international community. South Korea was not a signatory. On 28 April 1994, North Korea announced that it would cease to participate in the military ceasefire commission, but would continue contacts in Panmunjom through liaison officers and maintain the general conditions of the ceasefire. . .

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